Make sure to set different passwords for each domain registrar you use

Normally I stick with a couple of registrars to stay away from many troubles like operating the account management tools which will vary from registrar to registrar, customer service and it goes on…

One important thing I have learned in the past years is to set completely different password with each of the registrar you are using. Let’s say if someone cracks the account password of user A; he will definitely try the same password at other registrar user A has kept the domains.

So basically it’s good to keep your password mixed with numbers, special characters, capital letters so it will be difficult for one to guess. Also never keep something very familiar like combination of your name, birth date, etc. One of the best example of password can be something like $%))*Wg$!!>ga.

set different passwords with each registrar you use

I know it’s difficult for one to memorize it but you can save that in your computer at some hidden place so you can retrieve at your own convenience. Also you can note down and keep it in your locker or any safe place like that.

*NOTE* – Change your password right now if it’s not something like I gave an example right now. It’s for your own safety and will keep you out of trouble!

I have kept different passwords at each registrar I operate. How about you guys? Is it the combination of the above example or a plain one?

Does it matter which registrar your domains are registered with?

I am raising this question after reading out the post from Acro where he has filed complaint against Pool.com at BBB. Once you have read you must ask this question to yourself “Does it matter which registrar my domains are registered with?”

For me the answer is Yes, it does matter a lot. Actually in many ways. First and foremost would be the security of domains and pricing for me. Although there are many other factors to consider like ease of pushing domains from one account to another as well as transferring out of domains. Also the account management tools are very important when you have huge number of domains.

I would strongly suggest everyone to carefully select your registrar by keeping all these factors in your mind and give importance to each and everyone. I always try to keep my domains at a small number of registrars because spreading out every few domains to many registrar not only confuses you but someday may put you in trouble like I mentioned at the start of my post. Also you need to remember lot of different passwords (if you have set different passwords) you may set at each registrar.

I know most of the domainers like me regularly buy domains from domain auctions like NameJet, Pool, SnapNames, etc. Due to which our domains are at many different places. I just keep record for each domain that once the 60 day period is over I simply transfer the domain back to my favorite registrar GoDaddy.com. It has not only the best pricing for domains but offers good customer service, swiftness of transferring domains internally as well as externally in just few minutes. I really like the account management tool as well but to be honest it’s very slow to operate.

99% of my domains are always with GoDaddy and DomainMonster.com. I really like the support of DM but their control panel for bulk modifying the domains is really poor and they promised to improve that in near future. Not sure when the near future will come for them 😉

As you know I have invested in .IM domains for which I am using DM as my registrar. They also offer the best pricing for .IM domains and one of the great customer service. So for this specific purpose I think they are the best. Rest all my domains are with GoDaddy and I strongly recommend everyone to stick with them.

I would like to know if you really care which registrar you keep your domains and how is your experience with them?

Use same email address in WHOIS and for sending emails to end-users

As my father got involved on internet since late 1997 and started buying very few domains for business purpose which were related to his company name and products. My elder brother also showed some interest in early 2000 and I got late entry as I was very young that time and seriously had no interest in the beginning until I made few bucks online.

My brother bought several domains for his personal use and reselling purpose as well but never actively tried selling them. I asked him if I can try selling his domain and started using my email address @abdulbasit.com for selling his domain names. Mind you, he is having all domains under his personal email address. First up, I was not receiving good response from end-users and later one email reply opened my eyes that I must use same email address in WHOIS and for sending emails to end-users as well. The guy asked if I really owned this domain. I was like what the hell! Of course it’s my domain and the next reply was the email address I am trying to sell that domain is owned by someone else. That’s what the WHOIS says!

I told him the domain is of my family member and I am authorized to sell the domain. He was never interested and I was forced to change the email address in WHOIS to my ID because I wanted to sell that domain and contacted him again. From there on, he showed some confidence in talking with me. Eventually the deal didn’t go through because of pricing difference.

The thing I learned was to use the same email ID at both WHOIS and for sending emails to end-users which makes comfortable for the person who is dealing with you that the domain is owned by sender of email.

Care to share your experience in this regard? Have you had any experience like this before?

Which type of first-last name you must buy?

I was inquired by one of my blog reader who saw my domain name sale of EmilyJane ((dot)) com which was just over US$5,000. She shared one of her domain ChrisMosely ((dot)) com and asked how to sell this domain and what I did in order to get this domain sold successfully.

In my previous post I shared my sale of EmilyJane ((dot)) com and explained how I was able to sell that domain name. Normally I don’t invest in two word first-last name domain because it has very limited number of people who might be interested in buying your domain name.

There are several ways I go through scanning each first-last name domain before I take final decision of buying it. First is to look how many people are there with the same full name. To dig in deeply I look at Google by typing EmilyJane and see the result which shows there are lot of people with the same name and good number of websites having the same domain name in it.

Secondly, you can see how much exact number of domain names are taken in the same keyword I simply visit NameDroppers.com where I enter the domain like EmilyJane and select “Only Registered Domains” and find all the variations. Currently there are 121 registered domains having same keyword. If you give space between those two word name like Emily Jane than you can see there are 155 registered names.

If I find there are over 20 different variations taken than I go the next step to see how many people are there with the same name at LinkedIn.com – I could see there are 575 results for Emily Jane.

Also you can do one thing to see if there are any more variations registered with same keyword is to find at Google like this “EmilyJane .co.uk”. You will see that I have given space before .co.uk so copy the text if you wish to. It will show you all the .co.uk domains having EmilyJane keyword in it which NameDroppers doesn’t show. It display a limited number of TLDs with no ccTLDs option.

Now if I come to the domain of my blog reader who gave me ChrisMosely ((dot)) com so that I can guide her in right way. If you check like I did for EmilyJane you will find huge difference and very limited potential in this domain. Like there is not a single variation registered with same name. And having only 17 results at LinkedIn.

It’s all based on my view and how I go through scanning each domain name. There are many more ways to judge any particular domain name and I will discuss each of them in my future posts.

I would like to know if my readers agree with me or have anything else to say? I would love to hear comments from you, no matter how bad or good they are 😉

Sold first-last name domain for over US$5000

At the end of last year I sold first-last name domain to an end-user for US$5,165. The domain name was listed in DnJournal as well. Thanks to Ron Jackson for listing the domain.

I contacted the end-user and his initial email wasn’t so impressive. It seemed he wasn’t very much interested but asked for the price. I asked £3,200 equivalent to US$5,165 and told him that I have some flexibility so if he is really interested can contact me. Soon I received an email that he is not interested in negotiation and is willing to pay what I asked for!

It was really exciting and most importantly shocking that an end-user is not in the mood of negotiating the price and willing to pay what I wanted. The deal was completed very quickly and all was done in good manner.

I wish the buyer best of luck with the shorter domain they bought. Currently they operate with EmilyJanesFoods ((dot)) com

In my next post I will try to explain in detail whether you should invest in these first-last name domain because the possibilities are very limited as compare to selling product/service related domains.

In the meantime if you care to share any first-last name domain you have sold to date and how was your experience with it?